12.4.11

TAKE TWO CARROTS AND CALL ME IN THE MORNING

FROM HOPKINS MEDICINE MAGAZINE, WINTER 2010

TAKE TWO CARROTS AND CALL ME IN THE MORNING

Eating the right foods and spices—and avoiding the wrong ones—could go a long way toward staving off everything from gut ailments to cancer, say Hopkins experts. They share their tips for stocking a health-promoting pantry.

By Mat Edelson

 "Let medicine be thy food and let food be thy medicine." — Hippocrates

Ever since man first climbed down from the trees (or, depending upon your view, plucked that apple off that tree), eating has never been far from his mind (survival has a way of prioritizing everything). Given that sustenance equals life, food and health have culturally ridden shotgun throughout the ages. "Good men eat and drink so they can live," noted Socrates. "Eat, drink, and be merry!" commanded Solomon. "You’re famished. I’ll make a plate!!" pleaded my mother.

And, most likely, yours.

In the days before medicine, food was medicine…or at least it was seen as such. A browned apple for an upset stomach, chicken soup for congestion, champagne for septicemia (Pulitzer Prize-winning novelist Eudora Welty said her Mississippi father swore his use of the bubbly saved her ill mother’s life). It was sometimes hard to establish cause and effect (Garlic as an anti-vampiric? Hard to find test subjects), and yet generations of pantries held foods sworn to bind, purge, ameliorate, instigate, invigorate…in short, improve one’s well-being...

See the complete story at:
http://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/hmn/w10/feature2.cfm

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